Sunday, June 13, 2010

Thought for the Day

. . . When we write from poetic imagination, 
we access the transcendent 
and we incarnate it into our here-and-now world. 
This is why poetry is a threshold, 
on which we stand with one foot in the here and now
and the other in eternity. . . .
~ David Richo
Being True to Life: Poetic Paths to Personal Growth

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Psychotherapist David Richo's Being True to Life: Poetic Paths to Personal Growth was published last December. I recommend it.

Richo leads workshops on personal and spiritual growth that draw on his knowledge of Buddhism and Jungian theories. He many books include Shadow Dance: Liberating the Power and Creativity of Your Dark Side, The Sacred Heart of the World: Restoring Mystical Devotion to Our Spiritual Life, and Mary Within: A Jungian Contemplation of Her Titles and Powers (available on Amazon via resellers).

Richo's Website 

5 comments:

Cassandra Frear said...

I find that writing is like this for me -- poetry or prose.

I used to write poetry in high school. It was a kind of hobby. Of course, I wrote terrible stuff -- the usual teenage angst and fighting cultural expectations and the end of the world. Thankfully, I can't find any of it anywhere.

But it was good for me. I got to experience the slowing down of a soul on a page. Normally, we are simply moving too fast to heal.

I carried that into my writing later, without realizing it. Even now, I'm a relatively slow writer. I don't think that's bad. I grow more that way.

M.L. Gallagher said...

I've downloaded his book -- thank you for the 'find'!

What a beautiful quote to start my day.

Hugs

n. davis rosback said...

i feel that we all live upon this threshold.

n. davis rosback said...

we live upong this threshold between the here and now and eternity. i don't think that poetry actually makes this threshold, this place of here and now on the edge of eternity. but, i do think that there are things that happen or work through words that we don't understand.

shrinkingthecamel.com said...

Poetry as therapy? That sounds so right.